From the proof of the heart we move to the proof of the soul. As such, it must be borne in mind:  The proof of the heart appeals directly to the heart.  It is not meant to convince the mind.  Likewise, you may find yourself objecting to this proof of the soul.  But who is objecting, your mind or your soul? Let us work carefully.  First, this is an argument developed in the mind, but it is based on an appeal to the soul (or so say I).  Therefore, it may be engaged in two ways:  First, rationally.  Is the explanation coherent?  Are any logical fallacies committed?  Are any facts misstated or erroneous? The second is by the soul itself.  That is, you may not find any fault with the argument, except that it does not seem to convince your soul.  (Indeed, that is already accounted for).  Somehow, though you can imagine it seeming true to someone else, it does not seem true to you. Very well.  As to the mind, objections have been made to this argument, and answered.  In any event, though the argument is not mine, it seems eminently reasonable to me.  Any error is likely to be mine in the retelling. As to the soul, I cannot do any more than appeal.  Indeed, it seems that God Himself has left our souls to us, free from any worldly power.  That being the case, I would commend to you a penetrating search.  Let the immediate objections rest for a moment, and look yourself:  Does anything I am saying reach you, make contact with your soul?  Can you remember a time before when it did? Whatever you find, turn it over, examine it.  Even think of it as someone else, so that you can be as objective as possible.  Let us see what we find.